Extra Credit Opportunity – “Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism”

0-0fnsv8osb2r9x1hfDUE SUNDAY (MARCH 5TH) BY MIDNIGHT

  1. Read this article, here: https://electricliterature.com/diving-into-the-faery-handbag-on-fabulism-4b21505e2b9b#.ak8wewk6u
  2. Then trace how the author makes her argument (her use of sources, quotations, the structure of the essay, the language, etc.) in around 200-300 words. Post this response as a comment.
  3. After writing your own response, choose another classmate’s post to comment on. Evaluate this–tell us what you think they did well, could do better, whether you agree/disagree… that sort of stuff.

*** Come to class with an example of an argument that you admire. This can take the form of a video (speeches, advertisements…) or an actual article from the internet. Be prepared to present and discuss your choice in class. 

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24 thoughts on “Extra Credit Opportunity – “Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism”

  1. The author starts off with references to Peter Pan and Wizard of Oz where the stories involve real examples of Fabulism. Whether its Pan sewing himself to his shadow or a house in Kansas landing in the world of Oz, these type of stories enchant and capture the reader’s imagination. The essay is also structured very well. The references are spaced out enough to thoroughly explore each source. The author really hits the nail on the head when she describes fabulist stories where “magic is more in charge than we are. It has a body that isn’t bound by rules.” In other words, these type of stories can mean many different things to many different people, and they push the boundaries of our imagination. Goodrich says that the reason fabulist is so complex is because it is directly related to “real human feelings”. On the other hand, Realism stories are just taken at face value. Goodrich makes an example of a purse and how in a realist story, it would just be a regular purse compared to the many possibilities of the contents inside if it was perhaps a magical purse. The author uses many examples and explores them to make her argument for Fabulism instead of Realism

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    • This is a great review of the article. It is clearly stated all the references that are used and they are explained. Peter Pan and Wizard of Oz are talked about, as well as the comparison that is used involving the purse.

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  2. The author begins with expressing her love for stories with magic. Stories with elements of magic have always been intriguing to people. We love reading about things that are happening that we cannot explain. Reading about things that are out of the ordinary provide some sort of escape. She then begins to explain the difference between Fabulism and Realism. She points out the fact that many authors use symbols and gestures in their writing when using Realism; like in the stories by Tim O’Brien and Junot Diaz. Realists use subtle symbols in their writing that readers will only catch if they are really paying attention. The author then goes on to explain how Fabulism brings a sense of reality to the magic. She uses the example of a dead baby actually haunting someone in Toni Morrison’s story Beloved. Instead of simply feeling like a spirit was haunting them, an actual dead body was present. Fabulism is more “in your face”. The author conveys that magical realism requires the reader to finish the entire story before they are able to understand the metaphors and other underlying symbols. The author does a nice job of providing many specific examples of Realism and Fabulism so that the reader gets a clear understanding of exactly what she is referring to. Realism and Fabulism are both writing styles that contribute to the enchanting nature of fairy tales.

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    • This is a great summary and explanation of the article. Taylor mentioned all the sources that were used in the article and tied them to the example she provided in a scholastic way.

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  3. In the article Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism by Melissa Goodrich, she makes the argument that Fabulism makes the emotional reality the actual reality. She uses sources like a “The Faery Handbag”, Peter Pan, and the Wizard of Oz to describe fabulism. This helps the reader reference a familiar source. She references back to Kelly Links story “The Feary Handbag” by inserting a quote. The quote was a perfect example of fabulism and going deeper into the concept of what seems to belong to this world, but doesn’t follow all of the rules. The structure of the essay is very good because Goodrich breaks down fabulism vs. realism which is essential to the reading. She mentions stories like the “The Ceiling” and “The Well” to guide her reader to the point she is trying to make. The language she uses throughout the article is very understanding and not too complex. Sometimes I feel like authors make the language too complex that a reader can not grasp the concept. She did well in giving sources to help the reader understand the argument better. I now have a better understanding of how Realism and Fabulism are both writing styles that contribute to fairy tales.

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    • Nile did a great job of mentioning all of the examples that the author used in the article. She explained the overall message of the article and I appreciate her giving her opinion on the author’s overall writing.

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  4. In her article, Melissa Goodrich talks about the genre Fabulism. She starts off with a quote from “The Faery Handbag” which is going to be the main reference point for the rest of the article. She explains how Fabulism uses magic to engage the audience and uses Peter Pan and The Wizard of Oz as examples of this. She describes Fabulism saying, “It seems to belong to this world, but doesn’t follow all of the rules. It beckons you. It’s off. The more you explore it, the more mystery and power it has.” Goodrich goes on to compare Fabulism and Realism. She explains how Fabulism has “much greater agency” and that it “makes the emotional reality the actual reality.” She talks about the fun side of Fabulism and also the dark side of it. She uses different parts from “The Faery Hangbag” to describe both the fun and dark sides. She says it is fun because it reminds us of childhood stories and the playfulness of the stories. She also says how the dark side of Fabulism “separates the magical realism of the childhood stories from the magical realism of stories for adults.” She ends by explaining how Fabulism allows us “access to something magic and maybe dangerous.” She says this is possible because that’s how real human feelings actually are: magical and dangerous.

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    • Caroline definitely did a good job of expressing the authors main points through multiple references made in the article. She was able to tie up all the sources to bring her point across.

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      • Caroline used the perfect amount of references that stuck out the most in this article. She explains how Melissa described Fabulism in a very simple way.

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    • This is a great analysis on the article. Caroline cites many ways that the author expresses her argument and makes one logical point out of all of it, that human feelings are in sync with magical stories.

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  5. In the article “Diving into the Faerly Handbag: On Fabulism”, Melissa Goodrich does a great job using multiple references and speaking on both the side of fabulism and realism. She does a good job using universal references such as Peter Pan and the Wizard of Oz to describe the traits of fabulism. I was personally familiar to her reference on the realism side because we had to read “The Things They Carried” in high school but I still feel like her point is still displayed well. She talks about how “Toni Morrison’s Beloved would be if Beloved were just the memory of a dead infant”, this proves that fabulism is a key factor in making some books and movies the way they are. Telling a story through what someone would see through his or her imagination is tremendously more entertaining than just telling a boring plain story. ” I think we like it — the magic. It reminds us of childhood stories”. States this and then brings up the childhood story of Narnia and describes the wardrobe and the factor of using your imagination to depict the world of Narnia just on the other side of the few coats hanging up in there. She also references how fabulism is sometimes not bound by rules when she states “the magic is more in charge than we are. It has a body that isn’t bound by rules.” She references this in Ben Loory’s “The Well”. Overall I feel like the author is a fan of this fabulism way of thinking and writing because she states at the end, “we want access to something magic and maybe dangerous. Because real human feelings are”. Real human feeling can be magical and definitely dangerous as well.

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    • This is a great summary of Melissa Goodrich’s article about Fabulism. I like how you explain all of the references she uses and also how you were about to personally connect with one of them. I also like how you quoted some of her own thoughts to write your review.

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  6. After reading the article “Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism” the author uses multiple different references throughout the summary. Melissa Goodrich starts off by quoting a line from “The Faery Handbag” talking about how certain lines make you want to continue reading. She then continues with using Peter Pan and part from The Wizard of Oz. The last thing she uses is a comparison. She compares Fabulism to a purse and the world inside the purse, as well as the guardian of the purse. Using all these references is a great way to review something because a lot of the references Melissa uses are well known by most people. Using a large number of references could be a problem if they are not spread out, but she spreads them all out very well and can focus on the main points of the review.

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  7. In Melissa Goodrichs article, Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism, she talks about Fabulism in certain ways it depicts humans. She talks about both Fabulism and Realism in which she compares the two. She discusses how Fabulism uses magic. Melissa uses the examples that everyone knows, Pater Pan and The Wizard of Oz, this keeps the readers engaged in her article. Magic weirdly intrigues the audience because it is something that we cannot fully understand how it all works. Certain quotes and lines make the reader want to continue on and keep reading to see what will happen next. When she compares realism and Fabulism, she shows the two different sides. Fabulism has a fun side to it, but also a dark side. She uses many examples from “The Faery Hangbag” to show the two different sides. She talks about how Fabulism mirrors the way humans react to things and feel. She refers to Fabulism not having rules when she says, “The magic is more in charge than we are. It has a body that isn’t bound by rules.” Fabulism reflects human’s feelings in ways they are magical and dangerous.

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  8. Melissa Goodrich, in her article “Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism”
    argues the fact that we all inherently have a strong adoration of fantasy or magical stories.
    Goodrich makes her argument by saying that Fabulism, a form of magic realism in which fantastical elements are placed into an everyday setting, is like a magical purse. Goodrich uses the plotlines of many popular fantasy stories to back up her argument. Goodrich also begins to explain and argue that we enjoy fabulism simply for the fact that it is just fun and enjoyable to experience. To quote Melissa Goodrich on fabulism, “It gives us the flexibility to play, yes, but play while expressing truths.”. The author then proceeds to argue that with fabulism we can see how far things will go and how far we can take them. After explain about how much we admire fabulism, Goodrich then brings up the fact that fabulism itself is also extremely dangerous; referencing multiple stories in which the magical element is also the downfall of the protagonist or the people of the story in general. In essence, Goodrich argued that we love Fabulism for its three compartments; its realism, its inane sense of fun, and its mysterious danger.

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  9. Melissa Goodrich said about fabulism stories that everybody likes them “Because — we love stories with magic.” “Fabulism is a curious way to explore and understand the ordinary” said Goodrich. Melissa makes a good argument about how fabulism is loved by everybody and how it connects with stories in the real world. Goodrich uses many sources in her article to help get her point across. She also proceeds to describe fabulism in the perfect way “Fabulism is a lot like this purse. It seems to belong to this world, but doesn’t follow all of the rules. It beckons you. It’s off. The more you explore it, the more mystery and power it has.” Melissa Goodrich makes a compelling argument and uses strong language for her article about fabulism.

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  10. In the article Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism by Melissa Goodrich, she makes the argument that Fabulism makes the emotional reality the actual reality. She uses sources such as “The Faery Handbag”, Peter Pan, and the Wizard of Oz to describe fabulism. This helps the reader be familiar withe source and be able to relate to what she is talking about better. She references back to Kelly Links story “The Feary Handbag” by inserting a quote. The quote was a great example of fabulism and going deeper into the concept of what seems to belong to this world, but doesn’t follow all of the rules. The structure of the essay is very good because Goodrich breaks down fabulism vs. realism which is very important to the reading. Magic weirdly intrigues the audience because it is something that we cannot fully understand how it all works. Certain quotes and lines make the reader want to continue on and keep reading to see what will happen next. When she compares realism and Fabulism, she shows the two different sides. Fabulism has a fun side to it, but also a dark side.She mentions stories like the “The Ceiling” and “The Well” to guide her reader to the point she is trying to make. The language she uses throughout the article is very understanding and not too complex. Sometimes I feel like authors make the language too complex that a reader can not understand the concept. She did well in giving sources to help the reader understand the argument better. I now have a better understanding of how Realism and Fabulism are both writing styles that contribute to fairy tales. Both of these styles help with understanding fairytales.

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    • This summary of Melissa Goodrich’s article is very well explained. I agree with this summary and that Goodrich did well in giving sources to help the reader understand the concept more, because some authors do not do that. I also enjoyed this summary because it talks about why and how the quotes from the article were effective.

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  11. In Melissa Goodrich’s article “Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism,” she debates both fabulism vs. realism. Goodrich supports her argument in multiple different ways, a few being examples from other articles and books and quotes from them. She also compared and contrasted fabulism and realism. Goodrich states that fabulsim “has much greater agency” than realism and that it “makes the emotional reality the actual reality.” She compares fabulsim to a purse, and that the more you explore it, the more power it has. Goodrich talks about how we all love stories with magic and how it makes you want to keep reading it, which leads her to talk about Peter Pan and how his shadow needed to be sewn to his foot, or “The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe” and how the “wardrobe bursts open like a color, to let in snow fawns and seasons and lions and swords. Fabulism is a fun and curious way to learn. Realism is used by writers who are more into describing and analyzing their characters personalities and emotions. Melissa Goodrich’s structure of her article was easy to follow and understandable. I think it helped her article a lot that she used so many examples and comparing and contrasting because it was easy for the reader to follow.

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    • I really like the angle that Conner approached in explaining the article, especially his emphasis on love stories and their correlation with magic. I also agree that Melissa Goodrich’s approach of using ample sources was reassuring as a reader.

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  12. After reading the article Diving Into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism by Melissa Goodrich I was not only intrigued by the whole article but I also learned something I had no previous knowledge on. In the article the author, Melissa Goodrich, tells the reader about fabulism. Fabulism is a curious was to explore and understand the ordinary. So fabulism is basically a fancy word for fairy tails and Goodrich uses common fairy tails to keep the reader engaged. She uses a various amount of sources to back up her story and give insight to a reader who isn’t familiar with fabulism. Goodrich also does an amazing job of breaking down fabulism vs realism and two separate sides of fabulism (good vs. evil). Similarly her language was simple enough for anyone to understand and process. When some authors make an argument or try to inform their audience they sometimes try to showboat their knowledge of the subject but I don’t feel like Melissa Goodrich does this in any capacity.

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    • Cassady explains how Melissa described Fabulism in a very simple way. She explained the overall message of the article and I appreciate her giving her opinion on the author’s overall writing.

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  13. In the article, “Diving into the Faery Handbag: On Fabulism”, Melissa Goodrich exemplifies the different aspects of what Fabulism truly is. She starts right off the bat by engaging with her readers as she asks various questions to get our minds to begin thinking about the magical peices of Fabulism itself. Goodrich also uses a great example when referring to Fabulism as a purse that you can open in three different ways. In breaking up the three components of the purse, she is able to reveal the true meaning behind opening the purse one way, opening it another way, and opening it the wrong way. References such as Toni Morrison’s Beloved and the childhood stories of Narnia and The Wizard of Oz were great ways to show how Fabulism can be portrayed through narratives. The author really seems to be able to relate to her readers overall but what really stands out is that she mentions her fourth grade English class and how they view longevity and death from a completely different perspective than herself. The capability that Goodrich has to compare Realism with Fabulism as well as go in such depth about the world inside and out of the purse and the dark side is what makes this argument worth giving it some attention.

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  14. I personally had no clue what Fabulism was. After reading the article i can say that I now have a better understanding, due to the author grabbing my attention with quotes and sources that support her ideas. The way she breaks down fabulism and realism also helped with the understanding of the piece. Fabulism has more of a fun side to it, while dark components are still visible. She compares Fabulism to a purse and the world inside of it. “Fabulism is a lot like this purse. It seems to belong to this world, but doesn’t follow all of the rules. It beckons you. It’s off. The more you explore it, the more mystery and power it has.” It was also intriguing to see simple language about something so complex. We’re usually overwhelmed with big words and ideas which makes it hard to grasp certain concepts

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